Diabetic neuropathy is a chronic condition that sometimes accompanies diabetes mellitus. Brought on by long term high blood sugar, this is usually a complication affecting the feet and legs. Over time the nerves become damaged and fail to send sensational messages to the brain. This loss of sensation can cause injuries on the feet to go unnoticed, leading to ulcers.

A Diabetic needs to have eight good hours of sleep every night to be well-rested, alert, and healthy. People who get enough sleep tend to be able to lose weight, probably because they have the energy to exercise and lack the apathy that can lead to less than healthy eating choices.

There are so many resources online for diabetics, including the American Diabetes Association, so make use of all they have to offer! Many have support groups, articles, research and even links to local educators, who can help you learn even more. Take the time to know what’s going on in your body and you’ll live a long, healthy life.

Restaurants tend to serve you HUGE portions, so be prepared before they even bring your meal! Bring your own reusable container, or ask the waiter for a doggy bag up front, and then put away the parts of your meal which are going to be too much for you. Getting rid of it before you eat will curb your temptation to finish it all.

When you’re planning to go to a doctor’s visit, write down any concerns you have. It doesn’t matter how outlandish they may seem, it’s much easier to read them off a page (or PDA or tablet, whatever works for you) than trying to remember them. Every bit of information you gain will help you keep your health in check!

It is possible to lower your blood sugar with exercise, so give it a try and see what it does for you. Make sure to test yourself immediately after you exercise to make sure your blood sugar has gone down to a level that is tolerable, otherwise you’ll have to take your insulin.

If you suffer from diabetes it is a good idea to enlist the help of a qualified, registered dietician. The American Diabetes Association advises that all individuals with diabetes consult with a nutritional counselor. A dietician will help you to understand how different foods affect your blood sugar and can create a healthy eating plan based on your needs.

Diabetics should beware of caffeine as it can lead to potentially life-threatening blood pressure. Diabetes already has harmful effects on your organs, high blood pressure included, so you don’t want to tax your body any more than it already is. Caffeine can lead in a massive spike in blood pressure after ingesting it, so just stay away from it completely.

If you have been diagnosed with Diabetes – keep a diet diary! This is a handy tool! A diary will allow you to track what and how much you are eating. It will also help you detect a pattern you may have for a certain craving at a particular time of the day. You will be able to see which foods cause your blood glucose level to spike. Perhaps you can make some tasty alternatives that will not have such an effect on your Diabetes? Doing so will help you to avoid any unnecessary headaches.

Find a free clinic in your area to have your Diabetes monitored if you can’t afford to visit your doctor every three months. You can call your local Diabetes association, ask at a local hospital, or inquire through your Health Department, to find out where the closest clinic is to you.

Make sure to visit the doctor if you have any of the risk factors involved with getting diabetes. Make an appointment as soon as possible if you are overweight, over the age of 45, have a very inactive lifestyle, or you have family with diabetes. The sooner you get the tested, the better chances you will have in catching the ailment early.

Use resources like the internet to find diabetic recipes. Many diabetics get frustrated because they cannot find recipes for meals that are diabetic friendly. There are many substitutions to foods that taste just as good as the original including sugar-free chocolates, healthy kinds of pasta, sugar-free ice creams and cakes.

It is important for anyone with diabetes to check their blood sugar regularly. How often you check your blood sugar depends on your doctor’s instructions, but it should be done. Checking your blood sugar allows you to see what foods raise your levels. This makes it easier to catch level spikes.

Remove contributors to the complications of diabetes. Try to avoid unhealthy habits that will affect your heart health and chances for stroke. Smoking should be stopped at all costs, maintain a healthy blood pressure through stress management and salt control and evaluate lifestyle choices that can have less than favorable results.

If you have diabetes, you should aim to drink as much water as you can. This particularly holds true when your blood glucose is elevated because high blood sugar can cause a large amount of urination. Therefore, you need to drink water to prevent yourself from dehydrating during this time.

If you want to lower your risk for getting diabetes, you have to remain active. Try talking a fast paced walk for 60 minutes each day. When you are not focusing on working out, make sure you are still active. Try to walk instead of drive and take the stairs instead of the elevator.

Another good way to prevent diabetes is to control your diet. Eating too many foods with a high glycemic index, which usually means foods with large amounts of simple sugars like candy or soda, can cause your cells to become less sensitive to insulin, which can cause diabetes. Eat less and save yourself the medical bills.

If you are diabetic and notice numbness, tingling, pain or burning in your legs or feet, report these symptoms to your doctor immediately. Diabetic neuropathy can be avoided by keeping your blood sugar levels under control. It’s important for diabetics to treat their feet well. Toenails should be clipped regularly, skin should be moisturized and shoes should be comfortable and fit properly.